CONCYTEC

 

CONCYTEC

Coronavirus COVID-19
Publicaciones seleccionadas
por el CONCYTEC
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ABSTRACT
Objective: To compare COVID-19 vaccine hesitancy among hospital employees by demographics. Methods: Our institution has offered an mRNA COVID-19 vaccine to all employees since January 2021. We collected data on vaccination rates among hospital employees and looked for differences in demographic groups to determine in which groups vaccine hesitancy is the highest. Those who received at least one dose of vaccine were considered “vaccinated” for this study. Results: There was a 71% vaccination rate among all hospital employees as of March 10, 2021. Age over 50 (odds ratio 1.85, 95% CI 1.53 to 2.24, p<0.01), working in a clinical department (odds ratio 1.19, 95% CI 1.01 to 1.42, p = 0.02), and white race compared to black/African American race (odds ratio 4.55, 95% CI 3.74 to 5.52, p<0.01) were all significant factors for receiving vaccination. Gender (odds ratio 1.12, 95% CI 0.94 to 1.35, p=0.10) was not significant. Conclusions: In a population with equal access to the COVID-19 vaccine, there were significant differences in vaccination rates among different demographic groups. Employees under 50 years of age, non-clinical employees, and black/African American employees were less likely to be vaccinated. This suggests that attitudes towards vaccination, and not simply access to the vaccine, are factors in vaccination rates.
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ABSTRACT
Objective: To evaluate the mortality rates of 566,602 patients with coronavirus disease (COVID-19) based on sex, age, and the presence or absence of underlying diseases and determine whether the underlying disease provides prognostic information specifically related to death. Methods: The mortality rate was evaluated using conditional probability to identify the significant factors, and adjusted odds ratios (ORs) using a multivariable logistic regression analysis were estimated. Results: The mortality rate of patients with underlying health conditions was 12%, which was 4 times higher than that of patients without underlying health conditions. Furthermore, the mortality rates of women and men with underlying health conditions were 5.5 and 3.4 times higher than the mortality rates of patients without underlying health conditions, respectively. In a multivariable logistic regression analysis including sex, age, and underlying health conditions, male sex (OR: 1.83), age ≥ 41 years (ORs > 2.70), and underlying health conditions (OR: 2.20) were confirmed as risk factors for death. Conclusions: More attention should be paid to older patients with underlying diseases and male patients with underlying diseases as the probability of death in this population was significantly high.
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ABSTRACT
COVID-19 patients frequently develop neurological symptoms, but the biological underpinnings of these phenomena are unknown. Through single cell RNA-seq and cytokine analyses of CSF and blood from COVID-19 patients with neurological symptoms, we find compartmentalized, CNS specific T cell activation and B cell responses. All COVID-19 cases had CSF anti-SARS-CoV-2 antibodies whose target epitopes diverged from serum antibodies. In an animal model, we find that intrathecal SARS-CoV-2 antibodies are found only during brain infection, and are not elicited by pulmonary infection. We produced CSF-derived monoclonal antibodies from a COVID-19 patient, and find that these mAbs target both anti-viral and anti-neural antigens—including one mAb that reacted to both spike protein and neural tissue. Overall, CSF IgG from 5/7 patients contains anti-neural reactivity. This immune survey reveals evidence of a compartmentalized immune response in the CNS of COVID-19 patients and suggests a role for autoimmunity in neurologic sequelae of COVID-19.
 

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